Ilaro Court

 

This building is located on an area once occupied by a house known as “Glenelg”, the property of the late Mr. Charles W. Flemming, a Solicitor during the turn of the Century and was later purchased and rebuilt during the second half of the second decade.It was designed by Lady Gilbert Carter, wife of a former Governor of the Island at the time.
 
Lady Gilbert Carter was the American wife of Sir Gilbert Carter, a former Governor of Barbados. He had served as Governor of Ilaro in Nigeria prior to his arrival. Lady Carter was from a prominent Boston family, possibly the Peabodys. As a young lady she did the usual activities of someone of her social position. She took drawing classes and went on a grand tour of Europe before her marriage. This strengthened an existing interest in the Arts and Architecture.
 
With this background and training she designed Ilaro Court and named it after Ilaro in Nigeria. She also designed the Empire theatre, as well as smaller projects, such as the birdbath on the Esplanade. She founded the Ladies Self Help and of course, her larger undertaking was the layout of the grounds of Queen's Park.
 
Ilaro was built around a rectangular courtyard that overlooked a swimming pool. H.R.H. Edward, Prince of Wales swam in this pool during his visit here in 1920. During Lady Carter’s lifetime it was exquisitely furnished and the grounds and gardens were well kept.
 
This lovely building was purchased by Government in 1976, to be an Arts Centre, but was left to decay until the Government decided to make it the home of the Prime Minister.
 
The Parks and Beaches Commission was given the job to re-establish the gardens and it was officially opened on Independence Day 1980. The National Conservation Commission, having replaced the Parks & Beaches Commission takes great pride in showcasing this property as one of the best kept under its aegis. The immaculately manicured lawns and aesthetically pleasing gardens are also the venues for many important activities and functions.
 

 

 

This building is located on an area once occupied by a house known as “Glenelg”, the property of the late Mr. Charles W. Flemming, a Solicitor during the turn of the Century and was later purchased and rebuilt during the second half of the second decade.It was designed by Lady Gilbert Carter, wife of a former Governor of the Island at the time.
 
Lady Gilbert Carter was the American wife of Sir Gilbert Carter, a former Governor of Barbados. He had served as Governor of Ilaro in Nigeria prior to his arrival. Lady Carter was from a prominent Boston family, possibly the Peabodys. As a young lady she did the usual activities of someone of her social position. She took drawing classes and went on a grand tour of Europe before her marriage. This strengthened an existing interest in the Arts and Architecture.
 
With this background and training she designed Ilaro Court and named it after Ilaro in Nigeria. She also designed the Empire theatre, as well as smaller projects, such as the birdbath on the Esplanade. She founded the Ladies Self Help and of course, her larger undertaking was the layout of the grounds of Queen's Park.
 
Ilaro was built around a rectangular courtyard that overlooked a swimming pool. H.R.H. Edward, Prince of Wales swam in this pool during his visit here in 1920. During Lady Carter’s lifetime it was exquisitely furnished and the grounds and gardens were well kept.
 
This lovely building was purchased by Government in 1976, to be an Arts Centre, but was left to decay until the Government decided to make it the home of the Prime Minister.
 
The Parks and Beaches Commission was given the job to re-establish the gardens and it was officially opened on Independence Day 1980. The National Conservation Commission, having replaced the Parks & Beaches Commission takes great pride in showcasing this property as one of the best kept under its aegis. The immaculately manicured lawns and aesthetically pleasing gardens are also the venues for many important activities and functions.
 

Our Social Commitment..

The National Conservation Commission is committed to adding social value in all its endeavors. We are of the firm belief, that the growth of any nation is dependent on the growth of the society as a whole. Ensuring that a nation’s recreational requirements are met is of primary concern, especially in a hectic work environment. The Commission’s social commitment to the Barbadian community is well established and its mandate in this regard is wide and varied.